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HISTORICAL Archive

 
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Start

Year 02011

Science Fiction exosuits like Iron Man inspired them both. They intend to become the most influential figures in the wearable hardware space. Rise™ Robotics plans to introduce powerful and economical robotics into our reality.

Arron Accosta and Blake Sessions, two MIT graduated students who came together over the vision of personal wearable powered exoskeletons. Blake Sessions envisioned tangible means of being superhuman and Arron was inspired to be his first follower.

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THE HIP BELT

Year 02011

donned around the waist to unload the hip from stresses.  The configuration allowed for the support of a person's full weight without any imposition or restriction on their motion.
 

The first piece of innovation at the Rise™ Robotics lab was a passive mechanical hip belt to give the user the feeling of floating in water while suspended in an exoskeleton. Referred to as the Hip Belt, it consisted of a series of concealed cables and pulleys
 

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THE BOUNDERS BOOT

August 02012

the Achilles tendon efficiency by utilizing inexpensive and high-performance pultruded fiberglass sheets cut into diamond shapes to minimize structural and material waste.  Applied to the ankle joint, the user feels increased ankle elasticity that enables enormous stride lengths while keeping the user grounded.

 

With the intention of providing an elastic trampoline experience anywhere in the city, Rise™ developed the Bounders boot.  It consists of a "foot" component coupled to a novel compound fiberglass spring design that provides tremendous elastic energy at a minimum of weight and bulk. The new spring design mimics

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THE ANKLE CLUTCH

August 02012

a flexural clutch that releases the spring's stored energy at appropriate moments to allow for both amplification of motion at some times during usage as well as complete freedom of motion at other times, resulting in power amplification at the user's whim.
 

The bounders boot demonstrated the exotic spring design well, but the passiveness of the boot was limiting the full potential of improving the user's experience. The Ankle Clutch (as shown above) was an improvement of the Bounders boot by integrating

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THE FLIGHT SOURCE SPRING

November 02012

It worked by using tensile rope elements in tandem with the tessellated diamond shaped pieces of fiberglass. Nicknamed the "Flight Source", the spring proved to be incredibly power dense compared to traditional helical steel springs. 
 

Spring innovations lead Rise™ Robotics to compacting the fiberglass elements into a dense and modular assembly. As a successful component, Rise™ Robotics found it as an answer to the robotics industry where power density is a much desired trait. 

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THE HERO BOARD

Year 02012

Although the Hero Board was incredibly power dense and lightweight, it had complaints of not being robust enough for a product with such a high parts count. The Hero Board also suffered the shortcomings of a classical trampoline in the sense that they can only return energy not amplify. The Hero Board product was not worth mass producing until some of these short comings could be answered.

After some developed insights into product development, the team went back to improving the Flight Source Spring component.
 

To demonstrate the potential of the Flight Source springs to customers, a simple spring testing jig was made to compare and feel the differences between old and new paradigms. This physical demonstration proved to be such a successful way of communicating the importance of the proposed Flight Source Springs that commercializing the jig into a portable trampoline could be a way of generating revenue to help sustain spring research and development. This project was nicknamed "the Hero Board".

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THE FIBER BLOCK SPRING

Year 02012

The purity of the Flight Source was not forgotten, and alternative methods for manipulating the tensile rope elements were under development. This intension lead to the fact that actuation is a major limiting factor, not the elastic element.

Articulating the Fiber Blocks or the Flight Source springs became the real challenge. There was no actuator that came close to matching the efficiency of the light weight springs designed. This led to the insight that it is not springs that is not holding back industry, it is actuation.

The quest to develop a comparable actuator begins.


 

Working with the overtly complex Flight Source Spring components in the Hero Board informed the team to simplify and increase robustness of the components they design. With new insights and experienced pain points from trying to implement components to systems, the Flight Source Springs complexity dropped significantly. This improved version is nicknamed "The Fiber Block".  Although not as ideal as working with pure tension and pure compression, the Fiber Block Springs eliminated the need for tensile string elements to simplify assembly at the cost of power density metrics. The improved spring component also featured the ability to add or remove sections to tune & change the behavior characteristics of the spring. The overall column-like form it takes on is more familiar to what engineers are used to when designing with off the shelf components for hopes of better acceptance & adoption.

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PROTOTYPE OF THE FIRST ROPE PISTON

August 02013

However, due to its wide cross-sectional area, its rated Pounds per Square inch rating resides at 3.17, Rise™ Robotics's current means of measuring its ultimate performance. Its application demonstration was to assist Hesham's lift project an affiliate of Rise™ Robotics. As with any new innovation, failure modes are not entirely understood. This design would fail imminently if the lines were ever tangled by improper handling. 

Blake Sessions discovered a way of compacting and balancing the ancient Chinese Windlass mechanism as a cost effective way of efficiently converting rotary motion to linear motion. This compacted windlass approach is known as the "conical differential drive".

As a proof of concept, a 31 inch actuator was made utilizing a 1mm steel cable that could pull 45lbs over 100mm in an astounding 1.8 seconds. While weighing 300 grams.

Operating load
Cyclone reduction
stroke
stroke time (sec)
Speed
Mtbf - “life”
failure modes
weight

45 lbs
14
105.5 mm
1.8 sec
59 mm/s
10
immediate entanglement
0.7 lbs
 

70 %
1.8 inches
7.00 inches
31.6 inches
15.1 %
3.17
Pull Only

efficiency
height
width
length
contraction ratio
psi
push/pull

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THE NUVU MINI CYCLONE 1.1 ROPE PISTON

September to October 02013

applications where the device is put to best use.

12 of these actuators were distributed amongst student projects. 5 of them still function today and are consistently recycled from old projects.

An invention that behaves unlike any other linear actuator required customer validation wether it belonged in the marketplace as a usable component. Arron and Blake took this invention to a nearby technical high school to educate and distribute miniaturized rope pistons in hopes of seeing

Operating load
Cyclone reduction (not incl. Gears)
stroke
stroke time
Speed
Mtbf - “life” (strokes)
failure modes

62 lbs
9
67.8 mm
2.4 seconds
28 mm/s
25
Rotor Break due to material
0.2 lbs

efficiency
height
width
length
contraction ratio
psi
push/pull

60 %
2.17 inches
4.45 inches
12.22 inches
27.9 %
1.04
Pull Only

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THE CYCLONE 1200 SERIES

December 02013 to June 2014

The Cyclone 1 was incredibly fast, efficient, and back-drivable due to its minimal parts count and repair simplicity. It suffered from un-spooling when improperly handled with making this an unlikely candidate to be fully productized. 
 

The first Cyclone Rope Piston to be publicly debuted in front of Make MITFirst Robotics and Maker Fare. It is a robust improvement to the the Cyclone Mini. Featuring a balanced symmetry with one gear stage, this actuator was a substantial improvement of performance due to the utilization of Dyneema and Kevlar fibered ropes.

Operating load
Cyclone reduction
stroke
stroke time
Speed
Mtbf - “life” (strokes)
failure modes
weight

160 lbs
7
109 mm
0.6 seconds
182 mm/s
100
Gear teeth busting
0.9 lbs

85 %
4.65 inches
3.82 inches
16.25 inches
35.9 %
4.23
pull only

efficiency
height
width
length
contraction ratio
psi
push/pull

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THE CYCLONE 2

July to September 02014

The design was locked-in and local manufactures in Massachusetts were ready to initiate mass production but due to a skeptically high bill of materials price from the gearbox, plans were halted in fear of existential expenditures. Gears must be eliminated

The Cyclone 2 was the design to commit to a small run of 500 units to donate to the First Robotics Challenge as a competing component. This design focused on eliminating common failure modes seen on the previous versions. Featuring a single motor, a simplistic gearbox, and the new anti-detensioning rail system that eliminated the de-spoiling problem when improperly handled.

Operating load
Cyclone reduction
stroke
stroke time
Speed
Mtbf - “life” (strokes)
failure modes
weight

146 lbs
6
145 mm
2.5 seconds
58 mm/s
25
buckling over extension
3.5 lbs

60 %
3.74 inches
4.02 inches
26.97 inches
26.97 %
6.66
Pull Only

efficiency
height
width
length
contraction ratio
psi
push/pull

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THE CYCLONE 3

September 02014 to March 2015

compared to the previous version scheduled to be mass produced. This is the version that grabbed the attention of material handling companies and robotic laboratories. 

The 3rd Cyclone has been prototyped. With the additional complexity of pulleys, bearings, an infinite loop of rope, and the absence of gears, the new cyclones performance triples 

Operating load
Cyclone reduction (w/o Gears)
stroke
stroke time
Speed
Mtbf - “life” (strokes)
failure modes
weight

150 lbs
53
159 mm
0.8 seconds
199 mm/s
150
Wearing of Rope
2.4 lbs

efficiency
height
width
length
contraction ratio
psi
push/pul

60 %
3.54 inches
3.54 inches
23 inches
37.2 %
3.98
Pull Only

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DEBUT AT THE LAUNCH FESTIVAL

Year 02015

Once the Cyclone 3 prototype was able to back drive and prove its efficiency as predicted, Arron, Blake, and Bill decided to fly to San Francisco for the 2015 Launch Festival to debut to the public
 

a mechanism that the company could stand behind confidently. Our efforts payed off and received the Hardware Award. Investment alliances grew.
 

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THE CYCLONE 4

April to June 02015

robust. Self destruction by end conditions is now a thing of the past. A smooth and fast operation with a recommended 75lb limit.

With the Cyclone Cable Piston component becoming stable enough to quantify, Rise™ Robotics can begin demonstrating its utility within an Application.

With new insights into high life cycle testing of the tensile element, a new Cyclone Cable Piston architecture is made. Using a new robust co-molded Kevlar and Urethane round belt with a more compact rectangular cross-section, the Cyclone leaves behind issues of frailties and becomes significantly more

Operating load
Cyclone reduction
stroke
stroke time
Speed
Mtbf - “life” (strokes)
failure modes
weight

100 lbs
20
200 mm
0.3 seconds
667 mm/s
1000
Unloaded Jamming
4.4 lbs

efficiency
height
width
length
contraction ratio
psi
push/pull

80 %
2.99 inches
5.59 inches
21.3 inches
37 %
2.99
Pull Only

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THE CYCLONE 5 PNEUMATIC PUMP RIG

July to September 02015

products. First attempts were met with success when compressing a half gallon tank up to 100 P.S.I at 1.5 SCFM. Targeted to be a trim compressor, the cyclone also brings some unique benefits to the customer such as a lightweight structure with a quiet operation mode.

 The Cyclone Cable Piston can now push and pull with true backlash free properties. With this new architecture upgrade, we chose to cross pollinate this actuator outside of the Robotics space. Going after the existing pneumatic power tool market will be an excellent way to benchmark this new actuators abilities amongst existing

Operating load
Cyclone reduction
stroke
stroke time
Speed
Mtbf - “life” (strokes)
failure modes
weight

170 lbs
19
228 mm
0.25 seconds
912 mm/s
500k
Belt Overheating
9.9 lbs

efficiency
height
width
length
contraction ratio
psi
push/pull

60 %
2.25 inches
5.39 inches
36.22 inches
24.8 %
14
Push and Pull

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UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICIALLY ISSUED

September 02015

The Differential Conical Drive is officially issued with the United States Patent Office.
 

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Bacon™ robotic air compressor debut at ces 2016

January 02016

Rise™ Robotics Debuts the Bacon™ Robotic Air Compressor at the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show.

This is to be Rise's first robotic consumer product that will feature the Cyclone Linear Drive. With the Cyclone, Bacon™ will be a much

quieter, more efficient and portable solution to the commodity Pancake air compressors currently on the market. Rise™ plans on putting the Robotic Air Compressor on shelves by 2017. 

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KICKSTICK™ PRODUCT CONCEPT

Janurary 02016

In the summer of 2016, Rise™ Robotics begun developing an agnostic experimental electric skate product under the brand name KICKSTICK™. The product is a  2.5 horsepower electric motor at the end of a stick that can also fold up. Unlike other electric skate products, this handheld electric vehicle happens to be skate class agnostic because of its hand held nature.
 

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portable bacon™ flatpack air COMPRESSOR  PRODUCT CONCEPT

May 02016

 

Rise™ Robotics develops their first modular flatpack concept that utilizes the newly emerging Beltscrew™ drive to trial benefits in front of potential customers. In this concept, flow rate requirements were studied in relation to battery capacity.
 

 
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Kickstick™ Receives 5.5 million views across social media 

August 02016

 

After the debut of Bacon™ & Kickstick™ at the NY Worlds Fair Nano, Rise™ Robotics received over the next couple of months an accumulated 5.5 million views across social networking.
 

 
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Rise™ Robotics develops a wheelbarrow air compressor concept

October 02016

 

With in depth discussion between retailers, distributors, manufactures & end use customers, Rise™ Robotics developed a prototype that tests Bacon™ in the wheelbarrow  class of  larger air compressors.
 

 
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RISE™ ROBOTICS brings bacon™ to their first v.o.c. user group test

December 02016

 

Rise™ Robotics takes their Bacon™ wheelbarrow air compressor to Wisconsin to test the product in front of a variety of contractors and workmen to validate its benefits.
 

 
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1000 Hours of Continuous Testing achieved

April 02017

 

Our Beltscrew™ actuator has officially logged over 3.4 million strokes with over 1000 hours of continuous operation. With 44.5 days of continuous use, this was a successful test in observing long term degradation effects on continuously moving elements.